Healthy Recipes

Turkey Cranberry Sandwich

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Ready in 15 minutes – Makes 1 serving

2 slices whole-grain bread
2 tbsp Greek Yogurt
2 tbsp dried cranberries
2 slices (4 oz) turkey breast
Spinach leaves

1. Toast bread.
2. In a small bowl, mix yogurt and cranberries. Spread yogurt onto 1 slice of bread.
3. Top with turkey, spinach and second slice of bread. Serve.

Nutrients per serving: Calories: 315, Total Fats: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Trans Fat: 0 g, Cholesterol: 49 mg, Sodium: 566 mg, Total Carbohydrates: 43 g, Dietary Fiber: 4 g, Sugars: 20 g, Protein: 27 g, Iron: 4 mg

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Desktop Dining Guide

  |  in General, Healthy Recipes, Motivational Tips, Nutrition TipsNo Comments

Your workplace may be a bacterial breeding ground—germier than a public restroom! Think about how long that cheese ball sat in the conference room, the number of hands that have reached into the candy jar in the lobby, and the last time you properly washed your coffee mug. YUCK! For the safety of you and your coworkers, adopt these desktop dining guidelines as company policy.

Watch the Clock
If you pack a lunch that includes perishable food items—meat and cheese sandwiches, leftovers, salads, or dairy foods—don’t let more than two hours pass from the time you make your lunch at home to the time you put it in the office refrigerator. The same rule applies if you go out for lunch and bring back fast food, carry out, or doggy bag.

Refrigerator Review
The average office refrigerator is cleaned out only once every six weeks, even though most perishable foods spoil within three to five days! The office refrigerator should be cleaned out weekly, but no one wants to take on the responsibility, right? The solution is to assign each person who uses the refrigerator to a specific week in which they are responsible for pitching and purging. Anything left at closing time Friday is pitched. Post the weekly delegations on the refrigerator door, and if it’s a disaster come Monday morning, everyone will be able to determine who’s to blame.

Kitchen Clean Up
Splattered and scattered for all to see—the spaghetti that exploded in the microwave, the chicken soup that boiled over on the stove, the cream-filled doughnut remains on the counter—kitchen messes like these all spell DANGER. Keep anti-bacterial wipes readily available so team members can wipe up their spills and mishaps as a first line of defense.

But why not wipe up spills with the community dishrag or sponge? These are filled with germs and bacteria, which only spread around when you wipe up a mess. To keep a sponge or dishrag safe, run it through the dishwasher daily, or dampen it with water and microwave it on high for three minutes before using.

Desktop Danger
At the very least, you can keep your own beloved cubicle clean. Your desktop, keyboard, and phone are ideal for bacteria and germ contamination—especially if you eat while using any of these devices. But don’t forget all the other people who touch your desk area or sneeze on your belongings.

The best way to control the spread of germs is to clean your cubicle once daily with an anti-bacterial spray or wipes. Coffee pots are generally safe due to the high temperature, but be careful with your personal coffee mug. Clean it daily with soap and water, but if you use dairy creamers, you should wash it even more often.

The Social Scene
Nearly three out of five Americans work in an office where weekly, food is left out to be shared with others. If the food is perishable, find out how long it has been out before you dig in. If the food has been out for more than two hours, pass on the goodies. If you can’t resist the departmental pitch-in buffet, make sure you get there early, while food is still hot. Once again, foods left out for more than two hours are perfect for bacteria to set up camp.

All Washed Up
Fewer than half of all Americans wash their hands before eating lunch. The rule is to always wash your hands before, during, and after food handling. If you have no time to wash with soap and water, use a hand sanitizer stored in your desk drawer. Mom was right to always say, “Wash your hands before eating.” Now go wash up!

http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=531&page=3

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5 Surprisingly High-Cal Halloween Treats

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Fall is as good a time of year as any to re-evaluate your weight-loss goals and plans. But before you know it, Halloween brings the focus to candy and treats that may be tempting you to fall off the health wagon. One indulgent day of Halloween treats won’t hurt most people’s progress, but considering that Halloween is just the beginning of a two-month season packed with party foods and desserts, try not to get carried away.
 
As you’re looking for ways to enjoy the season without losing sight of your health and fitness goals, pick the smartest treats, but say “Boo!” to the biggest calorie monsters.
 
Here are five Halloween treats that should scare you!
 
1. Fun-Size Candy Bars
At an average of about 100 calories a pop, these popular trick-or-treat goodies may seem innocent—but that’s only the case if you stop at one. It’s pretty easier to eat four or five mini-bars as you take your kids trick-or-treating, and if they’re eyeing you from the reception desk at your office—forget about it! You may be eating one or more every day for weeks leading up to Halloween.

The bars that really pack the most calories are those with peanut butter, coconut, chocolate, caramel, and nuts. Plus, once they’re out of the larger packages, their nutrition facts are nowhere to be found on those individual labels.

Trick: Start reading nutrition labels of fun-size treats before throwing out the package. Figure out the best choice for you and stick with that when you’re having a Halloween treat. Peppermint patties and Twizzlers have about half of the calories than the average candy bar, but that doesn’t mean they are calorie free. Popping in a piece of sugar-free gum can help curb some cravings if you’re feeling tempted after eating just one. Read more: 11 Halloween treats under 100 calories.

 
2. Pumpkin Breads and Muffins
Pumpkin puree delivers vitamin A and fiber along in a deliciously low-calorie package that just screams of fall. But pair it with sugar, cream cheese frosting, shortening and butter, and you have a high-cal treat dressed in a healthy-looking orange costume. Restaurants and bakeries are the biggest villains: Pumpkin scones, muffins, donuts and breads range from 300 to 530 calories per serving, but most portion sizes can be double or triple in size. For a single treat, that’s a lot of damage to your calorie budget.
 

Trick: Bake your pumpkin goods at home, where you can control your recipe and make healthy baking substitutions, like subbing applesauce in place of oil and fat, choosing whole wheat flour over white, and cutting down on the sugar in a recipe. Using a mini muffin tin will help with portions as you bake perfectly-portioned pumpkin goodies. Start with these healthy pumpkin recipes from SparkRecipes for ideas.

 
3. Pumpkin-Flavored Lattes
Many coffee joints will have a special feature on their menu for the harvest season: pumpkin-flavored coffees. A medium pumpkin spice latte with whole milk from Starbucks has 410 calories, and the calories in similar drinks from other chains like Panera Bread and Dunkin Donuts are pretty similar. Think before you sip: Can you really budget 400+ calories into your day for a single drink?
 

Trick: Order the smallest size and lighten the load by requesting fat-free milk and holding the whipped topping. Plain hot chai tea with some added low-fat milk can also give you the warm fuzzy feeling of the season without all the added sweeteners of a pumpkin latte.
4. Candy Corn
Yes, these ever-so-traditional candies are quite small, but for candy corn lovers who wait all year for their favorite seasonal candy, they can be devastating to your healthy eating plan. The quintessential white, orange and yellow triangles have 140 calories for 22 pieces, which is a small handful at most. Have a few, and it’s no sweat, but sit near a candy jar full of candy corn, it can be hard to track just how much you’ve eaten since there is no built-in portion control.
 

Trick: Never eat candy corn from a large jar or straight from the bag. This can lead to mindless overeating and no real sense of calories or serving size. Pre-portion yourself a small serving and stick to it. Then put the bag away and walk away from the jar: out of sight, out of mind. Also try stretching out the sugar by combining a few pieces of candy corn with a trail mix of dried fruit and nuts for an added nutrition boost and more filling power.
5. Candy Apples
Don’t fool yourself: Just because there’s a piece of fruit underneath a thick layer of caramel, and possibly nuts, cookie chunks or even chocolate does NOT mean it’s good for you—or low in calories. If you cover a healthy fruit with sugar it becomes a much less healthful choice. A single apple might only contain around 80-100 calories of nutrition, but when it’s coated in caramel, it can more than triple in calories. Designer or “gourmet” candy apples covered in sprinkles, chocolate candies, nuts and chocolate are even worse.
 

Trick: Enjoy your apples by cutting them into wedges and dipping them into low-fat caramel dip, fat free vanilla yogurt or peanut butter.

 
 
The most important thing to remember during the Halloween season is to see these seasonal treats for what they really are: treats that should be eaten in moderation and in small amounts. Put your label reading skills to work and keep your goals in mind, and you’ll have no trouble avoiding Halloween treat temptation.

— By Sarah Haan, Registered Dietitian

 http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=1679

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Banana Berry Wake-Up Shake

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Shakes are a great way to increase fruit and milk intake. This creamy shake which, can be made the night before, is a great way to use up ripe bananas that have been frozen. When bananas start to get brown, pop them in the freezer and take out as needed.

Recipe:
1 banana
1 cup fresh or frozen berries (any combination)
1 cup milk or vanilla-flavored soy beverage
3/4 cup lower-fat vanilla yogurt (or other flavor that complements berries)

In a blender, liquefy fruit with a small amount of the milk. Add remaining milk and yogurt; blend until smooth. If shake is too thick, add extra milk or soy beverage to achieve desired consistency. Enjoy!

Per Serving:
Calories: 234
Dietary Fiber: 3 g
Fat: 4 g
Carbohydrate: 44 g
Protein: 9 g

To Happy, Healthy Living!

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Yummy Summer Salsa

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Roasted Tomato Salsa with Cilantro

If you cannot find these tiny heirloom yellow tomatoes, any grape or cherry tomatoes will do. The roasting coaxes fresh tomato salsa from bright and acidic into complex, subtle and sweet. If you don’t care for cilantro, try using basil instead, and serve this salsa as a bruschetta topping on toasted gluten-free bread rubbed with a clove of fresh garlic.

Ingredients

2 pints of yellow cherry or heirloom tomatoes, halved
1 small red onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, chopped
3/4 cup corn kernels
2 teaspoons dried or fresh cilantro
Sea salt
Olive oil
White balsamic vinegar

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

In a roasting pan combine:
2 pints of yellow cherry or heirloom tomatoes, halved
1 small red onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, chopped
3/4 cup corn kernels
2 teaspoons dried cilantro
Sea salt

Drizzle with
Olive oil
White balsamic vinegar

Toss to coat. Roast in a preheated oven until the tomatoes are soft and sweet, about 25 to 30 minutes. I stirred the mix halfway through roasting. Cool before storing. Store covered in the fridge. Just before serving allow the salsa to come to room temperature. Garnish with fresh chopped cilantro.

Serve with Brown Rice Tortilla Chips, corn chips, or triangles of toasted gluten-free garlic bread.

Total Servings: 6

Nutritional Information Per Serving

Calories: 265
Carbohydrates: 53.5 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Fat:  5 g
Saturated Fat: 0.7 g
Fiber:  15.5 g
Sodium:  377 mg
Protein:  11.7 g

http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/roasted-yellow-tomato-salsa-with-cilantro

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The Warm Weather Guide to Healthier Eating

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Looking for new, inventive ways to improve your eating habits? Warm weather can help you create better nutritional habits. From longer days to seasonal produce, the next few months are a great time to make your diet reach new heights.

Breakfast
Even though it’s typically the smallest meal of the day, breakfast is the most important one because it sets the tone for the entire day. What you eat, or do not eat, will determine how much you eat for lunch, dinner and snacks. If you skip breakfast, you become more likely to binge at lunch and load up on unneeded calories. So how can the pleasant weather help with eating breakfast?

Set up a system with Mother Nature’s virtues as the backbone. Now that the sun is out and the temperature is nice when you wake up, eat breakfast outside every morning. Pick a place – your porch, deck or favorite chair – and take 10 to 15 minutes to eat and enjoy. No need for eggs, bacon and all the fixins; cereal with skim milk, a whole-wheat bagel with low-fat cream cheese or a fruit smoothie is all you need to start the day right.

Lunch
This is a trouble meal for two reasons: 1. If you eat at a restaurant, it’s hard to control portion sizes, 2. It’s usually followed by sitting at a desk for the next several hours. This equates to consuming a lot of calories without burning any in return. A few more problems with a typical lunch out:

  • Lack of whole grains (mostly white bread, white pasta and white rice)
  • Few fruits and vegetables
  • Danger foods (French fries, fattening condiments)

The solution? Pack your lunch. You can control the portions, add fruits and veggies, make sure all of your carbohydrates are complex and avoid unhealthy snacks and sweets. Now about burning some of those calories, again take advantage of the warmer weather and eat away from the office. If you choose a spot that’s a 10-minute walk away, you’ll burn 120 calories just by walking there and back.

Still unsure? Do you usually eat lunch with work buddies? Bring them along! Make a lunch team where everyone packs their lunches and heads out of the office to eat. Better yet, each person on the team could make a healthy, big batch of food once a week for the rest of team, so every day is a different, healthy lunch. Everyone wins.

Dinner
Keep taking advantage of the longer days and fire up that grill. Grilling out has all of the good foods that come with hitting up the drive-thru; they’re just healthier versions. You can have a burger if you’d like, or go with healthier foods such as chicken or fish. You eliminate a lot of the grease that comes with frying. But who said to stop with meat? Add some veggies to the mix. Throw on a few ears of corn, or cut up and skewer some peppers, onions and tomatoes. Cooking on the grill will take up the same time as the drive-thru, and it’s cheaper, too.

Other tips:
From the flowers blooming in your garden to the vegetables for sale at the farmers market, bright colors abound during summer. Spread that variety to your diet with a healthy dose of different-colored fruits and vegetables. The food will taste great, and the presentation will be more lively.

  • Orange – oranges, peppers, carrots, peaches
  • Yellow – apples, peppers, bananas, corn
  • Red – apples, peppers, tomatoes, strawberries
  • Purple – blueberries, grapes
  • Green – peppers, kiwi, broccoli, peas, leafy greens
  • White – cauliflower, water chestnuts

Eliminating soda has enormous benefits to your diet. Replacing it with water would be preferable, but if you really crave that sweet taste in your drink, go for the spring and summertime favorite, unsweetened iced tea. It will quench your thirst on a hot day for fewer calories and less caffeine than soda. Or, give water a shot, but slice up a cucumber, lemon, lime or orange and drop the pieces in a pitcher to add some refreshing flavor.

Here’s to summer!<!–

http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=170&page=3
Article created on:  4/2/2004

–>

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National Watermelon Day!

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Today, August 3rd, 2011, is National Watermelon Day! Watermelon is a delicious fruit that is great to snack on. Watermelon is 92% water, and has many beneficial qualities:

  • Vitamin A found in watermelon is important for optimal eye health, can help prevent night-blindness, and boosts immunity by enhancing the infection-fighting actions of white blood cells called lymphocytes.
  • Vitamin B6 found in watermelon helps the immune system produce antibodies. Antibodies are needed to fight many diseases. Vitamin B6 helps maintain normal nerve function and form red blood cells. The body uses it to help break down proteins. The more protein you eat, the more vitamin B6 you need.
  • Vitamin C in watermelon can help to bolster the immune system’s defenses against infections and viruses and can protect a body from harmful free radicals that can accelerate aging and conditions such as cataracts.
  • A two-cup serving of watermelon is also a source of potassium*, a mineral necessary for water balance and found inside of every cell. People with low potassium levels can experience muscle cramps.

Get Hydrated with Watermelon!

It’s no coincidence that the word water appears in watermelon. Thirst quenching watermelon can help to replenish body fluids: one cup of diced watermelon is about 92% water. Water is the most vital nutrient for life– over two-thirds of your body is made up of water.

Along with drinking plenty of water, eating watermelon will help to provide you with liquids your body needs for optimum health. Try refreshing watermelon juice, which is now sold in some supermarkets.

Or you can easily make watermelon juice yourself: Slice a chilled watermelon into 2 inch slices and place in a blender or food processor and process until smooth. Press through a fine sieve, strain and discard seeds and pulp, pour the juice into a pitcher, chill and serve cold.

Watermelon and Weight Management:

With more than 60% of adults overweight or obese, over 97 million Americans are at risk to a host of chronic diseases. If you are trying to control your weight, watermelon is perfect because it has only 80 calories, no fat at all, and is full of satisfying flavor and important nutrients. A healthy food, 2 cups of watermelon chunks contain 25% of your daily vitamin A and 30% of your daily vitamin C. Watermelon also contains B6 (6%) as well as potassium (8%), phosphorus (4%) and magnesium (8%).
Most fruits and vegetables are naturally low in calories and fat; many contain lots of water and fiber to give you a feeling of fullness. Combined with an active lifestyle and low-fat diet, eating greater amounts of fruits and vegetables and fewer high-calorie foods at meals can help you control your weight.

http://www.watermelon.org/HealthProfessionals/HealthProfessionals.aspx

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Arugula and Apple Salad

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Arugula and Apple Salad
By A Nutritionist Eats
WebMD Recipe from Foodily.com

Shake up your regular salad by adding this tangy vinaigrette to fresh arugula greens and crisp Granny Smith apple slices. The result is the kind of salad that can make you forget about dinner. The kind of salad that people return to for seconds. The kind that has stray fingers wandering into the bowl after everyone is stuffed hoping for one last flavor-soaked slice of apple.

Ingredients
1 Tbsp dijon mustard
1 Tbsp agave or honey
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 granny smith apple, thinly sliced
6 cups arugula greens

Instructions
Whisk dressing ingredients together and toss with arugula and apple slices. *Tip: after tossing everything together, stuff 1 portion of greens in a mug or cup and invert on plate for a fancier presentation.

Total Servings: 4

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 75
Carbohydrates: 10.4 g
Cholesterol: 0mg Fat: 3.8 g Saturated Fat:0.5 g
Fiber: 1.4 g
Sodium: 51 mg
Protein: 1.0 g

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Mixed Berry Butter Crunch Parfaits

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Servings: 6

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ c. packed brown sugar
  • 1/3 c. coarsely chopped pecans or walnts
  • ½ c. cold butter or margarine
  • ½ cup cold butter or margarine
  • 1 ½ cups cereal (Try a high fiber cereal, special K, etc.)
  • ½ c. flaked coconut
  • 6 containers (6 oz each) fat free red raspberry yogurt
  • 1 ½ cups blackberries , blueberries and raspberries

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  • Combine flour, brown sugar and pecans in a large bowl. Use a pastry blender to cut in butter into the mixture until crumbly. Mix in the cereal and coconut. Transfer the mixture to an ungreased 13 x 9-inch pan.
  • Bake for 15 minutes, stirring once. Take the pan out of the oven and let it cool for about 15 minutes.
  • Prepare 6 parfait glasses. Layer each one with 1 to 2 tablespoons of cereal mixture, 1/2 container of yogurt and 2 tablespoons berries. Make another set of this layer for each. Place a tablespoon of the cereal mixture and serve with additional berries as garnish, if preferred.

Place the rest of the cereal mixture to chill until serving.

Source: www.healthyrecipe.net

Do you have a healthy recipe you would like to share? We would love for you to share it by leaving it in a comment box!

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English Muffin Breakfast Pizzas

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Looking for a hearty breakfast idea? Then check out this muffin base pizza with a cheesy egg topping – ready in 20 minutes.
Source: www.eatbetteramerica.com

Servings: 4
1 c fat-free egg product or 4 eggs
¼ c fat-free (skim) milk
Dash of salt
Dash of pepper
2 tsp canola or soybean oil
2 tbsp chopped onions
2 tbsp chopped red bell pepper
2 tbsp chopped cook ham
½ c shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese (2 oz)
2 whole wheat English muffins, split, toasted

1. In small bowl, beat egg product, milk, salt and pepper with wire whisk or fork until well blended.

2. In 10-inch nonstick skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Cook onion, bell pepper and ham in oil 3 to 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are crisp-tender. Pour egg mixture into skillet. As eggs begin to set at bottom and side, gently lift cooked portions with spatula so that uncooked egg can flow to bottom. Cook 3 to 4 minutes or until eggs are thickened throughout but still moist; stir cheese into eggs.

3. Spoon egg mixture evenly over muffin halves and enjoy!

Nutritional Information:

1 Serving: Calories 150 (Calories from Fat 40); Total Fat 4 1/2g (Saturated Fat 1g, Trans Fat 0g); Cholesterol 5mg; Sodium 570mg; Total Carbohydrate 16g (Dietary Fiber 3g, Sugars 4g); Protein 14g

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